Reverse detail from Kakelbont MS 1, a fifteenth-century French Psalter. This image is in the public domain. Daniel Paul O'Donnell

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English 3450a: What I did/did not know about Anglo-Saxon England

Posted: Sep 04, 2008 13:09;
Last Modified: Jan 14, 2011 10:01

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Contents

Instructions

Read Blair’s Anglo-Saxon England, A Very Short Introduction and write a brief essay discussing some aspect of Anglo-Saxon England that intrigues you. This might involve

Purpose

The goal of this project is to help you begin to refine your interests in the period with an eye towards your final research project. The best work would therefore most likely involve some additional preliminary secondary research on the topic filling in Blair’s account, looking for more information, or countering opinions. At this stage, the work need not (probably should not) be exhaustive. All you need really is to identify an area that might be interesting to look at further.

Rubric

This is a formative exercise and hence will not count again directly against your final grade (unless of course it is the best grade in the category). It is being assigned to help you begin to organise your interests in advance of beginning your final project.

I will be assigning you a grade so that you can use this to assess your own progress. For this project, I will be following my standard essay rubric, though with less emphasis on argument and thesis and more on evidence of engagement and problem definition. I will also be taking into account the preliminary and slightly informal nature of the assignment.

Due date and Length.

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