Reverse detail from Kakelbont MS 1, a fifteenth-century French Psalter. This image is in the public domain. Daniel Paul O'Donnell

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Cædmon Citation Network - Week 14

Posted: Sep 02, 2016 18:09;
Last Modified: Sep 02, 2016 18:09

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Hi all!

I spent this week putting information into the newly updated database. It works much faster than it did before, and is very intuitive to use. Dan mentioned that he would like to see some screenshots, so please enjoy the following images:

Here we see the front page of the database, with two text boxes, one for the Source and one for the Reference.

Options will pop up after you begin typing which makes adding sources and references super quick.

The Location box allows you to type the page number on which you found the reference in your source material (I simply type the number without any “p.” or “pg” preceding it) and the drop down box allows you to choose whether the reference is a Text Quote, Text Mention, Scholarly Reference, or Other Reference.

Clicking on the “View Entries” link allows you to view all of the entries that you have made. They are listed from oldest to newest in one big list.

So far I have had zero problems with the database, however I have been coming across a few snags with regards to gathering references from the sources. To use this first article by Lenore Abraham as an example, it is not noted anywhere which edition of Bede’s “History of the English Church and People” that she uses, she just simply gives the title. I am not sure how to figure this out, but feel that it is important to know as the edition cited is the most important piece of information that we are attempting to gather. I am concerned that a lot of other articles might omit this information as well, but I suppose we shall see as the collection continues. I was also curious as to whether or not we count the “about the author” blurbs when adding references. The beginnings of articles will occasionally list other pieces the author has published and I am not sure whether or not to count these as references. My initial instinct was to ignore them, as they do not necessarily have anything to do with the article in question, and if they are important they will be cited again further on, however I thought I would bring it up to be sure.

I am excited to continue collecting information. I will be back in Lethbridge for school on Tuesday, so I can start requesting inter-library loans again and keep our project rolling!

Until next week,

Colleen

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Cædmon Citation Network - Week 11

Posted: Aug 05, 2016 13:08;
Last Modified: Aug 05, 2016 13:08

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Hi all!

I have a very short blog post this week, as the week itself was very short. I spent the last few days collecting more sources, doing some scanning, and preparing to begin data collection.

The database should be up and running this weekend, meaning data collection can officially start next week. I will see Garret on Sunday and we will be able to do some test runs on the database to make sure it is working properly. We have been discussing its functions over video conference several times throughout the week, and it seems to be coming along very well!

Next week I will be splitting my time between continuing to collect sources and beginning data collection, a suggestion made by Dan during our last meeting. This will allow us to understand any flaws in our collection system earlier on, rather than waiting for EVERY source to be collected and scanned before we try out our system. I am optimistic that it should all go well, and will report back at the end of next week!

Until then,

Colleen

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Cædmon Citation Network - Mini Update (Week 9)

Posted: Jul 22, 2016 12:07;
Last Modified: Jul 22, 2016 12:07

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Hi all!

Just thought I would post a short update for you, as I was meant to have started reading and collecting data by this point. Unfortunately my efforts have been sabotaged by the library’s book scanner which has been refusing to work properly for me.

At the beginning of the week it worked beautifully for two batches of scanning, however on the third batch it kept kicking me out and deleting my work, saying that it did not have enough memory. The library staff was quick to look at it, but as the “book scanner expert” was not available that day, I had to wait for it to be fixed.

I busied myself with other work (it turns out that I was not quite finished collecting sources, there was a sizeable chunk that had escaped my notice!), and came back this morning with even more books to scan, but a new issue has arisen:

Now when I scan a batch the images show up on the screen, but it doesn’t register as having scanned them. The screen provides me with a page count, but no indication of how many megabytes have been scanned, so when I go to email the images it says “NO IMAGES SCANNED!”. The images have been scanned! I see them on there!

Anyway, the I.T. staff are on the case and will let me know when they get it working again. The scanner really does work wonderfully when it does work, and it is so much faster than a conventional scanner or photocopier. I will continue collecting sources today, and hopefully get a chance to use the scanner again before the library closes. I also plan to come in this weekend to try to catch up on the work that was lost throughout the week.

I feel bad that it is almost August and we are still not at the data collection point. Hopefully things will go a bit smoother once everything is scanned and organized!

Until next week,

Colleen

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Mounting University of Lethbridge "P," "R," and "W" drives under Linux

Posted: Feb 19, 2014 14:02;
Last Modified: Jul 20, 2016 16:07

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Here’s how to mount “P” (Personal), “R” (shared research), “W” (web), and department/committee drives at the University of Lethbridge.

Contents

“P” drives

Your “P” drive is the windows share that represents your standard network desktop (i.e. the thing you see if you log into a classroom or other computer on campus).

The address is ulhome.uleth.ca/$USER where $USER is your account username (the same as the lefthand side of your uleth email account, or, in my case, daniel.odonnell.

ulhome is a CIFS drive. To mount it, you seem to have to use the commandline (I can’t seem to find the right protocol to use to use the GUI that comes with the file navigator in Ubuntu. I found instructions that worked for me here: http://www.tonido.com/support/display/cloud/Howto+properly+mount+a+CIFS+share+on+Linux+for+FileCloud

And, to solve the permissions problem that first arose, http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1409720

One-time mount

To mount the drive by hand for a single session, do the following:

  1. Make sure cifs-utils is installed
  2. Choose a mount point. This can be an existing directory (if the directory has local content, it will not be available while the network drive is mounted). Or you can create a custom mount point. I did the latter: mkdir ~/ulhome
  3. Mount the remote drive. sudo mount -t cifs -o username=$USER,password=$PWORD,rw,nounix,iocharset=utf8,file_mode=0777,dir_mode=0777 //$REMOTEURL $MOUNTPOINT (where $USER = username; $PWORD = password; $REMOTEURL = url of CIFS drive; and $MOUNTPOINT = the directory you chose or created in step 2. Note: your IT department may not give you the full remote URL, since Windows can use the first part of the subdomain; at the U of L, for example, IT tell you the share is called \\ULHOME. I guessed it is probably in the University’s main domain and was correct: \\ULHOME is the same as //ulhome.uleth.ca/)

Automount

To permanently mount the drive you need to create a password file and use that in /etc/fstab:

1. Create a file /root/.smbcredentials with the following content:

username=$USER
    password=$PWORD

p.2. Change the permissions such that only root can read the file.
sudo chmod 700 /root/.smbcredentials

3. Now add the following line in /etc/fstab file.

//$REMOTEURL $MOUNTPOINT cifs default,uid=1000,gid=1000,credentials=/root/.smbcredentials,rw,nounix,iocharset=utf8,file_mode=0777,dir_mode=0777 0 0

nb: the default,uid=1000,gid=1000 part comes from http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1409720 This is to answer the problem of them mounting RO. When I tried this out, I then had to go into the directory on my local machine and manually change the permissions from access only to read and create.

4. Test if the line added in the fstab file works.

# sudo mount -a

5. Now the remote share should be mounted at /mnt/storage.

Your “R” drive

The “R” or research drive is a shared drive you can use for collaborative research projects. It is found at uleth.ca/research/$DRIVENAME where $DRIVENAME is the name IT gives the space (e.g. genee_students).

You access this using smb (Microsoft’s workgroup protocol)

  1. In Nautilus, choose “Connect to Server”
  2. In the dialogue that pops up enter the network name, prefixed by the smb protocol (smb://uleth.ca/research/$DRIVENAME).
  3. In the authentication dialogue, your username is your (full) uleth email address; password is the same as your uleth network password.
  4. That’s it.

Your “W” drive

The “W” or public drive (the drive your web files are on) is found at files.uleth.ca. This can be ssh’d into and so is a lot easier to use.

ssh $USER@files.uleth.ca

Department and committee drives

A third kind of drive is department and committee drives. These are often made by IT with spaces in the name (grrr). An example might be: cifs://uldept.uleth.ca/ResearchServices/BoGRC Committee

There are different ways of handling spaces in file names depending on how you are mounting things. For use from the commandline for one-off mounting, several normal options (e.g. \ , \040, and %20) don’t seem to work. What does seem to work is putting the whole directory with the space in quotation marks. So in the above example, the following works (where $USER is your uleth username) : sudo mount.cifs //uldept.uleth.ca/ResearchServices/"BoGRC Committee" BOG -o username=$USER

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